Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from cliffchiang  617 notes

Happy Batman Day!

cliffchiang:

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Here are a couple sketches from the aborted “Bat-Man” project with Azzarello.  Initially conceived as a First Wave title, I wanted Robin to be the son of Wu Cheng from the Blackhawks — fuck you, Chop Chop — sent to be raised in the US by Bruce Wayne. Get some pulp in that juice.

Reblogged from fishingboatproceeds  4,920 notes
fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

Reblogged from heck-yeah-old-tech  4 notes

heck-yeah-old-tech:

The Standard Dictionary of Facts, 1917 edition.

Ten volume encyclopedia (divided by theme) bound into one book, originally published in 1908 by Frontier Press and revised every couple years. Shown here are the American presidential details, ending with Woodrow Wilson (who was near the end of his first term at the time of publication) from the History section, and the book opened to a random place in the Science/Education/Religion section (thus the segue from Lungs to Lutherans).

Reblogged from axetemptation  1,934 notes
axetemptation:

T is for “too close,” as in “There’s no such thing.”You know the feeling. Lips, hips, legs – everything pairs up, and close just isn’t close enough. When two human bodies want to get together, there’s not much that can keep them apart. It’s one of the most powerful forces in the world. Guess that’s why they call it attraction.
T E M P T A T I O N

axetemptation:

T is for “too close,” as in “There’s no such thing.”

You know the feeling. Lips, hips, legs – everything pairs up, and close just isn’t close enough. When two human bodies want to get together, there’s not much that can keep them apart. It’s one of the most powerful forces in the world. Guess that’s why they call it attraction.

T E M P T A T I O N

Reblogged from spaceexp  2,400 notes

projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.

     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.

     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)

     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).

     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.

     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.