AndyJayDee

profanefame:

peashooter85:

An ornate 6 shot wheel-lock revolving musket decorated with gold, silver, ivory, and bone.  Originates from Russia, 16th century, possibly restored or added onto in the 18th or 19th century.

UGH

profanefame:

peashooter85:

An ornate 6 shot wheel-lock revolving musket decorated with gold, silver, ivory, and bone.  Originates from Russia, 16th century, possibly restored or added onto in the 18th or 19th century.

UGH

AndyJayDee
AndyJayDee

fedorea:

why are men so afraid of women having leg hair???????? women have to put up with ur chest hair and back hair and gross pubic hair and scratchy facial hair all the time and u dont shave that bc ‘it takes too much time’ like…????? ok thanks for ur hypocrisy u dried up sink sponge


Source fedorea
AndyJayDee
AndyJayDee
AndyJayDee
AndyJayDee

wapiti3:

The naturalists’ miscellany : or Coloured figures of natural objects; drawn and described immediately from nature. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
By Shaw, George, 1751-1813 
Nodder, Elizabeth
Nodder, Frederick Polydore,
Publication info London :Printed for Nodder & co,1789.
Contributing Library:
Museum Victoria
BioDiv Library

wapiti3:

The naturalists’ miscellany : or Coloured figures of natural objects; drawn and described immediately from nature. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
By Shaw, George, 1751-1813 
Nodder, Elizabeth
Nodder, Frederick Polydore,
Publication info London :Printed for Nodder & co,1789.
Contributing Library:
Museum Victoria
BioDiv Library


Source wapiti3
AndyJayDee
AndyJayDee

edwardspoonhands:

isault:

Oh, Hank. You had no idea… 

[x]

I did actually. I called John after I read it and I said “this is going to change your whole entire life. If you think what we have is big now, this is going to be so much bigger.” 

I thought it was so good that I was more scared that excited. I didn’t want the book to take over as the central thing in Nerdfighteria. I want Nerdfighteria to be about remembering to be awesome and thinking hard about people and situations and the world…and I was worried this book was going to be so big that it would usurp all of those things and Nerdfighteria would just be people who like TFiOS. 

That fear was unfounded…for the most part…but I did not under-estimate TFiOS. I knew from the moment I put it down that it was going to be a very big deal, that just would have been a really weird thing to say in a video.

Thanks to you all for being more than fans of a book…or of a YouTube show. 

edwardspoonhands:

isault:

Oh, Hank. You had no idea… 

[x]

I did actually. I called John after I read it and I said “this is going to change your whole entire life. If you think what we have is big now, this is going to be so much bigger.” 

I thought it was so good that I was more scared that excited. I didn’t want the book to take over as the central thing in Nerdfighteria. I want Nerdfighteria to be about remembering to be awesome and thinking hard about people and situations and the world…and I was worried this book was going to be so big that it would usurp all of those things and Nerdfighteria would just be people who like TFiOS. 

That fear was unfounded…for the most part…but I did not under-estimate TFiOS. I knew from the moment I put it down that it was going to be a very big deal, that just would have been a really weird thing to say in a video.

Thanks to you all for being more than fans of a book…or of a YouTube show. 


Source isault
AndyJayDee

nprfreshair:

New York Times journalist Carlotta Gall spent more than a decade reporting from Afghanistan and Pakistan after 9/11. Her book, The Wrong Enemy, offers new information about how Islamabad has helped the Taliban in Afghanistan, and how Pakistan’s intelligence agency may have helped Osama bin Laden hide out in Abbottabad, Pakistan:

"We knew [bin Laden] was hiding almost in plain sight in Pakistan, but when I finally learned this from an inside source – so, someone who really did know — it made sense that they were hiding him and protecting him to use him, I think, for their own reasons.

I think one of the reasons was that they knew he was a powerful figurehead of al-Qaida [and] of Muslim fighters around the world, and I think they wanted him on their side, a bit controlled, to use him for their own policy-making. And so they used him to control and influence their own militant proxy forces that Pakistan has been fostering and sponsoring for several decades now … [including] to fight in Kashmir …

I think also they didn’t want to be the nation that handed him over to the U.S., to be seen by other Muslims as the ones who betrayed this hero or Muslim warrior, as he’s often seen …

They were always telling the west that the trail had gone cold. [Pakistani] President [Pervez] Musharraf came to Washington and said that: We have no information, maybe bin Laden is dead. There was a failure not only to cooperate with the U.S., who was supposed to be the great ally and has pumped money and assistance into Pakistan for this last decade or more, but there was actually genuinely an effort to mislead and to hide him when they knew that this was the one great target for America after Sept. 11.”

Photo : Osama bin Laden’s hideout in Abottabad, Pakistan via Getty Images

nprfreshair:

New York Times journalist Carlotta Gall spent more than a decade reporting from Afghanistan and Pakistan after 9/11. Her book, The Wrong Enemy, offers new information about how Islamabad has helped the Taliban in Afghanistan, and how Pakistan’s intelligence agency may have helped Osama bin Laden hide out in Abbottabad, Pakistan:

"We knew [bin Laden] was hiding almost in plain sight in Pakistan, but when I finally learned this from an inside source – so, someone who really did know — it made sense that they were hiding him and protecting him to use him, I think, for their own reasons.

I think one of the reasons was that they knew he was a powerful figurehead of al-Qaida [and] of Muslim fighters around the world, and I think they wanted him on their side, a bit controlled, to use him for their own policy-making. And so they used him to control and influence their own militant proxy forces that Pakistan has been fostering and sponsoring for several decades now … [including] to fight in Kashmir …

I think also they didn’t want to be the nation that handed him over to the U.S., to be seen by other Muslims as the ones who betrayed this hero or Muslim warrior, as he’s often seen …

They were always telling the west that the trail had gone cold. [Pakistani] President [Pervez] Musharraf came to Washington and said that: We have no information, maybe bin Laden is dead. There was a failure not only to cooperate with the U.S., who was supposed to be the great ally and has pumped money and assistance into Pakistan for this last decade or more, but there was actually genuinely an effort to mislead and to hide him when they knew that this was the one great target for America after Sept. 11.”

Photo : Osama bin Laden’s hideout in Abottabad, Pakistan via Getty Images


Source nprfreshair